Photo Essay: Chinese New Year 2017 in Rural Hangzhou, China

It’s the year of the golden rooster. Happy Chinese New Year! While I’m taking a little time off to recharge a little during the holidays, I thought I’d share some photos from our Chinese New Year celebration in rural Hangzhou, China.

The biggest dinner of the year — Chinese New Year’s Eve dinner!

As always, every Chinese New Year’s Eve includes passing out the hongbao (红包,red envelopes) stuffed with lucky money for the new year.

As always, Jun and I brought some Chinese New Year gifts (nianhuo, 年货) to share with the family. On the left I’m carrying a gift box filled with an assortment of fancy nuts (complete with a “golden egg” design visible on the box); on the right, a gift box of large Xinjiang jujube dates.

On the first day of the new year, it’s time to wear your new clothes! Jun and I are both wearing new sweaters.

With such beautiful weather on the first day of the new year, we couldn’t resist stealing away to the countryside to enjoy the gorgeous scenery. Here we discover a waterfall cascading down the cliffs.

As we wandered beside the river, we were bathed in the golden sunshine. It was one of the most relaxing afternoons I’ve enjoyed in a long time.

The evening of the first day of the new year, I also helped my mother-in-law make migu, a special turnover we enjoy during the holidays. The dough is made from rice flour, and the filling is usually tofu and pickled vegetables and/or bamboo.

We visited Jun’s godfather during the holidays, presenting him with a hongbao and some baijiu liquor. He prepared us some sugar cane to snack on. Above, there he is, peeling off the rough exterior of the cane as I watch in the background.

As usual, we dined on some of the most delicious food of the year. One of our most memorable meals was at Jun’s Aunt and Uncle’s home next door to us. She even prepared a special hotpot of savory tofu and napa cabbage, plus her mouthwatering homemade kimchi. Yum!

Wishing everyone a prosperous and auspicious Chinese New Year!

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13 thoughts on “Photo Essay: Chinese New Year 2017 in Rural Hangzhou, China

  • February 2, 2017 at 11:03 am
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    Gorgeous photos Jocelyn! Hope that you both have a prosperous 2017 😀 xx

    Reply
  • February 2, 2017 at 1:12 pm
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    Lovely photos. Those tables sure are loaded with food. I love your sky blue jacket. Is that new? You always seem to find time to get out in the beautiful countryside. Love that waterfall picture.

    Reply
    • February 3, 2017 at 2:29 pm
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      Thanks Nicki. We don’t get out in the countryside nearly enough, but when we do we always take loads of photos! 😉 The jacket is from last year, actually (new clothes for new year 2016) — yeah, it has become a favorite of mine.

      Reply
  • February 3, 2017 at 1:50 pm
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    Wow! I really love the photo of you along the river, really beautiful!

    Reply
  • February 4, 2017 at 4:29 am
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    Fantastic waterfall!

    Here in the states, it’s more like the year of the orange rooster, of course.

    Or maybe the apocalypse.

    Reply
  • February 4, 2017 at 5:47 am
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    Great photos! Thanks for sharing Jocelyn! I missed the New Year celebrations with my fiancée this year 🙁

    Happy New Year!
    Dave

    Reply
  • February 4, 2017 at 7:01 am
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    Happy Year of the Rooster! What lovely photos. You look so happy and full of youth–I swear you’re aging backwards! It looks pretty warm there, too!

    Reply
  • February 4, 2017 at 7:24 pm
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    I really enjoy your photo essays and the glimpse they give into everyday life in the Chinese countryside Jocelyn, I hope the year of the rooster treats you both well 🙂

    Reply
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