‘Everything I Never Told You’ by Celeste Ng To Become TV Series

The best-selling debut novel by Celeste Ng titled “Everything I Never Told You”, a dark story centering on a family with a Chinese American father and white mother living in 1970s small town America grappling with an unimaginable tragedy, will be developed into a TV series, as reported by Variety.

Back in 2014, when Celeste Ng first came out with her novel, I had the honor of interviewing her for HippoReads. Here’s an excerpt of what I wrote about the novel:

Everything I Never Told You touched me on a personal level. Naturally, I was drawn to the family at the heart of the story. I write about Asian interracial relationships and am married to a Chinese national, so it was refreshing to read a book featuring an Asian father and a white mother raising mixed-race children. More importantly, Everything I Never Told You perfectly captures the insidious nature of race-based discrimination in America and reminds us that Asian Americans are not in any way exempt (despite the pervasive “model minority” stereotype about Asians which I previously debunked on Hippo Reads). While Celeste Ng set her novel in the 1970s, my husband (who lived with me in the US for nearly eight years) also faced discrimination similar to what the novel’s father, James Lee, suffered in the story. When I was reading Everything I Never Told You, I felt as if the Lee family’s sorrows could easily have been my own. It was an incredibly cathartic experience.

If you haven’t yet read “Everything I Never Told You”, you can find it at bookstores including Amazon, where your purchases help support this blog.

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One Reply to “‘Everything I Never Told You’ by Celeste Ng To Become TV Series”

  1. This is fantastic news! I think one of the most powerful scenes in the novel is when James enters the room to teach his course on the American cowboy and the majority of students leave. Their rationale is that an Asian man can’t “really” be American and understand the cultural zeitgeist surrounding the wild west.

    I read one review of EINTY that pointed out that the family treated their eldest son differently because he “looked the most Asian” and embodies a lot of anti-Asian stereotypes like asexuality and overachieving. Their daughter, even though she’s a tragic character, was favored for her blue eyes. What are your thoughts, Jocelyn? I also found it interesting that Celeste Ng made the book semi-autobiographical, but purposely made it an AMWF story.

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