Cracking the ‘Hummus Code’ in a Healthy Tradition at Home – Pub’d on China Daily

China Daily recently published my column titled Cracking the ‘hummus code’ in a healthy tradition at home. Here’s an excerpt:

As a longtime vegan enamored with many meat-free Middle Eastern dishes, which are much harder to find in restaurants in China, I made a powerful discovery in my own kitchen recently: I had finally cracked the “hummus code”.

Made of chickpeas, tahini sesame paste, olive oil, lemon juice and minced garlic, hummus is like a kind of high-protein manna from heaven to many vegans, including me. While most people serve it as a dip, often with soft pita bread and raw veggies, you can also add it to your favorite sandwich, dab it on your salad, or even smear it on your morning toast in place of butter. And speaking of butter, some of the best hummus I’ve ever sampled evoked the flavors of this classic spread in a lusciously creamy texture that will have you hooked.

So naturally, as I had been spending more time indoors due to the coronavirus, preferring to cook at home, it was only a matter of time before I started craving what was to me a vegan comfort food.
I just never expected that this time around, I would produce a hummus so smooth and buttery that even my husband Jun, a notoriously finicky eater, would be ooh-ing and aah-ing with every bite.

No doubt I owe some of my success to using a superior recipe this time around (from the blog Cookie and Kate, deservedly dubbed “best hummus recipe”), as well as my kitchen gadgets (pressure cooker and food processor both played pivotal supporting roles in the process). But regardless, the hummus proved a tasty revelation-that with my very own hands, I could actually whip up a version of the dish recalling restaurant offerings.

In this sense, I’m reminded of my mother-in-law in rural Zhejiang, who has over the years created on her own a repertoire of dishes so mouthwatering that I had jokingly christened her dinner table the best restaurant in China.

Read the full column here. And if you like it, share it!

Help Test Recipes From First-Ever Chinese Cookbook Covering The Entire Cuisine

All Under Heaven

Fabulous food writer — and fellow yangxifu — Carolyn Phillips (who I interviewed a few years back) has a historic cookbook coming out in May 2015. Titled All Under Heaven, it’s the first Chinese cookbook to cover all of China’s 35 cuisines. Here’s the intro from the publisher’s website:

Vaulting from ancient taverns near the Yangtze River to banquet halls in modern Taipei, All Under Heaven offers a comprehensive, contemporary portrait of China’s culinary landscape and the geography and history that has shaped it. With dozens of recipes and lucid, set-by-step instructions, this is the first cookbook in English to examine all thirty-five cuisines of China. Drawing on centuries’ worth of culinary texts, as well as her own years working, eating, and cooking in Taiwan, Carolyn Phillips has written a spirited, symphonic love letter to the flavors and textures she fell in love with over thirty years ago. From simple fried green onion noodles to Lotus-wrapped Spicy Rice Crumb Pork, All Under Heaven serves as both a handbook for the novice and a source of inspiration for the veteran chef.

So here’s the deal — they need folks to sign up to test out recipes from the book:

You’ll get an exclusive preview of a recipe from the book, a coupon for a preorder discount, and you’ll provide us with essential feedback to make sure no errors sneak by us and ruin your next dinner party. We’ll also post your pictures of the process and the finished recipe to this website…. Cooks of all experience levels are welcome, and we can accommodate any dietary restrictions.

If you’re a huge fan of Chinese cooking and would love to be a part of this, head on over to the All Under Heaven webpage and enter your e-mail right now!