Outbreak Spurs More Creativity, Ingenuity in the Kitchen – Pub’d on China Daily

During this novel coronavirus pneumonia outbreak, a lot of folks have spent more time indoors. And that has inspired a feast of delicious foods, cooked right in our own kitchens. Online I had noticed so many friends here in China sharing mouthwatering photos of their latest kitchen creations, which often reminded me of my own efforts to cook delectable dishes at home.

So I wrote a column about it for China Daily, titled Outbreak spurs more creativity, ingenuity in the kitchen. Here’s an excerpt:

As the novel coronavirus epidemic has swept across China, deeply affecting the lives of all of us who live here, it has also spurred many of us to rediscover the pleasures of cooking as a delicious way to pass the time and become a little more self-sufficient.

Just before the epidemic exploded, with news of human-to-human transmission, I had just received my latest kitchen gadget-an electric pressure cooker. This purchase was intended to satisfy my yearning for a faster and more convenient way to cook soybeans, which normally requires several hours of care on the stovetop after soaking overnight. I had visions of turning the two large bags of organic soybeans I had bought from the supermarket into the variety of soups and stews I crave during the winter.

The pressure cooker indeed helped me make a bean stew spiced with an aromatic Indian masala for Chinese New Year’s Eve dinner. But during the extended holiday, when authorities warned people to stay in as much as possible and we had run out of tofu, we used that pressure cooker almost daily to make a batch of soybeans that could serve as a high-protein substitute, with delectable results. For example, we used to always use tofu when we made our spicy Korean-style fried rice. But the soybeans actually tasted just as good, if not better, in the dish, and filled us up even more.

A couple of times, we also used the pressure cooked soybeans to create a version of one of my favorite dishes from childhood-baked beans, made with onions, ketchup, brown sugar, soy sauce, a little vinegar and a dash of garlic powder. Even my husband thought the dish rivaled some of the best canned versions we had enjoyed on our many camping trips in the US.

Read the entire column here. And if you like it, share it!

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